Waldorf Salad — 1896

Waldorf Salad — 1896

“A seed hidden in the heart of an apple is an orchard invisible.”

~Welsh Proverb

Oscar PhotographAs a young man of sixteen, Oscar Tschirky immigrated to America from Switzerland with his mother in 1883 to join his older brother in New York City  where they hoped to make a better life. Within a day of his arrival, Oscar landed a job as a busboy in the Hoffman House, an elegant hotel in the city. Five years later he was manager of a dining room in Delmonico’s, the best restaurant in New York, where he refined the skills necessary to become the Matre d’ of the Waldorf Hotel (soon to become the Waldorf-Astoria). Hired before the hotel opened in 1893, he was essential in stocking supplies, hiring staff and developing management systems. Oscar, himself, turned the key on opening day and went on to become the”face” of the Waldorf-Astoria during his fifty-year career. Ironically, beloved by heads-of-state, Hollywood types and business tycoons, Oscar’s lasting claim to fame was the Waldorf salad. 

Waldorf Cookbook coverThough not a chef, just three years after the opening of the Waldorf, Oscar published a 900-page cookbook titled The Cook Book by “Oscar” of the Waldorf  1896 which includes a now-ubiquitous recipe for Waldorf Salad. Calling for three simple ingredients, apples, celery and a good mayonnaise (recipe below), it seems much too humble for the glitz and glamour of New York high society, but the salad had had a victorious debut at a gala event planned and overseen by Oscar coinciding with the opening of the hotel.  

Waldorf Salad

Coming upon a copy of Oscar’s original Waldorf Salad recipe (above), I was disappointed that no particular variety of apple was suggested. It would be interesting to experience the exact flavor profile of the original.

Also being curious about the adaptation of the recipe over the past one hundred years, I researched nearly two dozen twentieth-century cookbooks. Interestingly I found that most of them contained a recipe for Waldorf Salad, many very similar to the original version, with some specifying red-skinned apples. The only twentieth-century cookbook, Cooking In Quilt Country 1989, that mentions using a particular variety of apple calls for Jonathan or McIntosh. Either apple may well have been the variety that Oscar used as they both grew prolifically in New York state at that time. Perhaps part of the charm and longevity of this recipe is that the home cook can personalize it simply by the variety of apple he or she uses.

Chopped Nuts

One of the earliest adaptations of Waldorf Salad is the addition of chopped nuts — walnuts usually, but also pecans as mentioned in The Joy of Cooking 1931 by Irma Rombauer. Curiously, her recipe is one of the few that suggest peeling the apples before chopping. The Waldorf Salad recipe found in The Household Searchlight Recipe Book 1944 (below) stays true to Oscar’s original recipe except for the now classic addition of chopped nuts:

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What’s In the Dressing

Another common adaptation to Waldorf Salad is the dressing, especially early in the century when commercial mayonnaise was in its infancy. Martha Meade’s Modern Meal Maker 1939 contains a recipe-ette called Apple and Celery Salad, but its confusing. How is the one cup shredded lettuce intended to be used — mixed in with the salad or as the lettuce cups — Hmmm. The Golden Dressing is the intriguing part of this recipe (below). Its fussy, but maybe not as fussy as homemade mayonnaise. And it sounds delish (recipe below).

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Mary Meade’s Modern Homemaker Cookbook 1966 suggests adding whipped cream to the mayonnaise dressing. She also suggest using unpared red-skinned apples (recipe below):

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Before salad dressings were readily available in grocery stores, cooks made them at home so older recipes frequently call for a “cooked” or “boiled” dressing. A recipe for Waldorf Salad (below) printed in General Foods Cook Book 1932 containing apples, celery and nuts calls for Cooked Salad Dressing made of thickened mustard, sugar, egg yolks, vinegar and milk — sweet or sour:

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A curious dressing for Waldorf Salad comes from a recipe found in The American Woman’s Cook Book 1966 which calls for a French vinaigrette to dress the apples, celery and walnuts. The salad is served on lettuce leaves and topped with a dollop of mayonnaise. 

Adding Variety

Mid-century home cooks began expressing their creativity by including additional fruits in their Waldorf Salad. The Good Housekeeping Cookbook 1963 is a perfect example of this. The recipe titled Pear Waldorf Salad (recipe below) suggests substituting fresh peeled and diced pears in place of apples in an otherwise typical Waldorf Salad. Being intrigued by this recipe and canning pears at the time, I decided to give it a try. It was delicious! Bartlett pears, however, are softer and juicier than apples causing the salad to break down quickly. If I were to make it again, I would follow the recipe’s alternate suggestion of using half apples and half pears. Notice the other inclusions in Pear Waldorf Salad — fresh, frozen, or canned pineapple, banana cubes (a strange term) or one cup sectioned oranges, and one cup grapes. The final adaptation of this recipe takes us full circle to the classic Waldorf Salad with unpared red apples, chopped celery, and walnuts tossed with a mayonnaise dressing and embellished with a half cup of raisins.

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The final Waldorf Salad entry is a recipe found in Farm Journal’s Busy Woman’s Cookbook 1971 titled Waldorf Variation Salad — an appropriate title for nearly all twentieth-century Waldorf Salad recipes. It takes a citrus-y spin with frozen lemonade concentrate as the dressing (recipe below):

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My Waldorf Salad recipe is fairly traditional, calling for apples, celery, and chopped pecans with a mayonnaise dressing sweetened with a little honey. Sometimes I add a handful of raisins or dried cranberries for flavor and texture. It is a delightfully crisp Autumn salad that is a nice addition to a salad bar or as a side dish. The variety of apple that I often use is Honeycrisp because of its thin, tender red skin. Older varieties such as sweet-tart Jonathon or McIntosh are also tasty choices. For a lighter version of the dressing, a thick plain Greek yogurt can be used in place of the mayo, but the salad will be missing its wonderful piquant flavor. Enjoy!

Waldorf Salad

  • Servings: 6
  • Difficulty: Easy
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Ingredients

  • 3–4 large red-skinned apples
  • Juice from a half lemon OR a sprinkling of Fruit Fresh
  • 1 cup finely chopped celery

  • 1/2–3/4 cup mayonnaise or plain Greek yogurt
  • 1–2 Tbsp honey (adjust to your taste)

  • 1/2 cup chopped toasted pecans
  • 1/4 cup raisins or dried cranberries (optional)

Directions

  1. Dice apples and sprinkle with lemon juice or Fruit Fresh; set aside. Finely chop celery and mix with apples in a large bowl.
  2. In a small bowl, blend honey with mayonnaise or Greek yogurt. Drizzle dressing over apples and celery; toss to coat.
  3. Fold in chopped pecans, reserving some for garnish, add raisins or dried cranberries if desired.
  4. Chill until ready to serve.

Note: Yogurt dressing begins to break down quickly so plan to serve the salad no more than an hour after preparing. The mayonnaise dressing is more stable.

Recipe Compliments of Cookbooklady.com

 

Summer Tomato Salad

Summer Tomato Salad

“It’s difficult to think anything but pleasant thoughts while eating a homegrown tomato”.

Lewis Grizzard

A recipe from Irma Rombauer’s Joy of Cooking 1974 called French Tomato Salad has been the inspiration for a a flavorful addition to my catered salad bars. The recipe calls for six thinly sliced tomatoes arranged overlapping on a serving plate and poured over with a French (vinaigrette) dressing and sprinkled with minced shallots or thinly sliced green onions.

Also taking inspiration from the 1950s Italian Caprese Salad consisting of sliced tomatoes, sliced mozzarella cheese (made with buffalo milk if you want to be authentic), fresh basil and olive oil (Americans often add a little balsamic vinegar as well to give the salad some zip), I have created a hybrid version of these two recipes that is colorful and packed with flavor. I call it Summer Tomato Salad (with or without mozzarella cheese). During late summer when fresh tomatoes are at their peak, I serve this salad often and I sometimes even make a light meal of it for myself (recipe below). Enjoy!

Summer Tomato Salad

  • Servings: 6
  • Difficulty: Easy
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Ingredients

  • 3 – 4 fresh medium-size tomatoes, sliced
  • 1/2 medium sweet onion, finely chopped
  • 1/2 cup small fresh basil leaves or more as needed
  • Optional: 1 lb fresh mozzarella, sliced (my favorite)

Dressing:

  • 1/3 cup olive oil
  • 1/4 cup red wine vinegar
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1/4 tsp black pepper or to taste
  • 1 small garlic clove, minced

Directions

  1. Thinly slice tomatoes and arrange overlapping in shallow serving dish.  Carefully insert a basil leaf in between each of the tomato slices. (If using, insert a slice of mozzarella in between each of the tomato slices then insert a basil leaf between each tomato and cheese slice). Sprinkle finely chopped sweet onion over tomatoes.
  2. In a small shaker jar, combine dressing ingredients, shake well and pour over vegetables (and mozzarella). Refrigerate salad for at least two hours to blend flavors. Serve cold.

Recipe Compliments of Cookbooklady.com

Cucumber Salad with Sour Cream Dressing

Cucumber Salad with Sour Cream Dressing

Heaven is a homegrown cucumber. ~Alys Fowler

Cucumbers taste like summertime. Simply sliced with a sprinkling of salt or added to a green salad they are a refreshing bite. We are all familiar with the classic Cucumber Salad made with  slices of fresh cucumber marinated in vinegar and salt and pepper. Its a recipe that has been around for generations. In this post, I’m sharing another favorite cucumber recipe — Cucumber Salad with Sour Cream Dressing. It is a combination of sliced cucumbers and leeks seasoned with fresh garlic and dill and marinated in a sour cream dressing. I have served this dish as a part of a catered salad bar and as a summer side-dish and it is a crowd pleaser. Enjoy!

Cucumber Salad with Sour Cream Dressing

  • Servings: 4
  • Difficulty: Easy
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Ingredients

1 large English cucumber, sliced

6 – 8 slices of leek, white part only

Dressing:

1/2 cup sour cream

2 tsp seasoned rice vinegar

1/2 tsp dried dill weed

1/4 tsp seasoning salt (my favorite)

1 small clove garlic, minced

Dash of kosher salt and cracked black pepper

Directions

Peel cucumber, if desired, and cut in 1/4″ slices. Thinly slice leeks and toss vegetables together in a bowl; set aside.

To prepare dressing, whisk together sour cream and seasoned rice vinegar in a small bowl. Stir in minced garlic, seasoning salt, dill weed, salt and pepper.

Toss cucumbers and leeks with prepared dressing. Refrigerate for two hours or more in an air-tight container to allow flavors to blend. Serve cold and garnish with additional dill weed.

Option: For a tasty and colorful addition, slice a fresh Roma tomato in 1/4″ slices and add to the dressed cucumbers and leeks.

Recipe compliments of Cookbooklady.com

Picnic Bean Salad

Picnic Bean Salad

LICENSE PLATESRoad Trip

As a kid did you ever play travel games to pass the time while on a road trip? I remember playing  “I Spy”, the “License Plate” game and “Simon Says” with my siblings as we drove across the state to visit our grandparents. My personal favorite was the memory game “Going on a Picnic” where each player says, “I’m going on a picnic and I’m going to bring…” the player then lists an item starting with the letter “A” such as Apples. The next player says, “I’m going on a picnic and I’m going to bring Apples and…”, that player adds an item beginning with “B“, and so on. In our version, the items didn’t always have to be food items — every picnic needs Paper Plates, Napkins, a Volley ball and maybe an Umbrella, in case of rain.  As I recall, the last person always brought Zucchini.

Picnic Bean Salad

Most times, when my family took a road trip, it was for a family celebration or reunion which often involved a potluck picnic where everyone brought their signature dish to share — a dish that travels well, serves a lot of people and gets the cook the most compliments. On my husband’s side of the family, my signature dish has become Four Bean Salad (a recipe handed down on my mother’s side of the family).  I almost feel guilty that such an easy salad is my requested contribution. There is almost no work involved in the prep as most of the ingredients come from a can. It travels/stores well since there is no mayonnaise in the dressing and the presentation is eye-catching with all the colorful ingredients. Best of all, the flavor is zippy! Lucky is the person who gets the last few tablespoons of vinaigrette in the bottom of the bowl once the vegetables are gone. Drizzle that over potato salad or green salad and it takes flavor to a whole new level!

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The Good Housekeeping Cookbook 1963
Nouveau Bean Salad

I remember my grandmother making Bean Salad when I was a little girl. With some research in my twentieth-century cookbooks, I discovered that Bean Salad was still fairly nouveou in the 1960s. The first Bean Salad recipe on record was printed in a booklet put out by Stokely — Van Camp (processors of canned dried beans and makers of pork-and-beans) in the 1950s. The earliest recipe printed in a comprehensive cookbook is found in The Good Housekeeping Cookbook 1963. The Good Housekeeping recipe, appropriately titled Three Bean Salad, calls for one pound cans of french-cut green beans, yellow wax beans and red kidney beans drained and combined with half cups of minced green pepper and onion, to be dressed with a classic vinaigrette consisting of salad oil, cider vinegar, sugar, salt and pepper. The directions suggest making the salad the day before serving to allow flavors to blend. My grandmother’s Four Bean Salad (recipe below) is very much like this recipe.

A Good Vegetable Salad

While researching pre-1950s cookbooks, I didn’t find a single bean salad recipe, but I did find recipes for marinated green beans to be served as a cold salad, so I’m wondering if marinated green beans might have been the precursor to the now classic Bean Salad.

bean salad 001Elizabeth O. Hiller’s 52 Sunday Dinners 1913 suggests serving a cold Veal Loaf (very similar to meatloaf of today) on the first Sunday in July. The recipe instructs the home cook to pack the seasoned ground veal “solidly in a granite, brick-shaped bread pan” and “bake in a moderate oven for three hours”. The veal loaf is then chilled, removed to a platter and surrounded with a “good vegetable salad”. The recommended vegetable salad is String Bean Salad (recipe above) comprised of cooked string beans, void of strings of course, marinated in French Dressing (meaning a vinaigrette) sprinkled with sliced fresh onion, chopped parsley and Nasturtium blossoms for garnish (Nasturtiums are a brightly-colored edible flower with a peppery flavor similar to radishes). Joy of Cooking 1931 also presents a comparable marinated String Bean Salad minus the veal loaf and flower blossoms.

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The Modern Family Cook Book 1953, Green Bean Salad (Interestingly, not only are there page numbers, but each recipe is assigned a number as well).

Modern Stringless Green Beans

Beans (Green or Wax) Young pods are now stringless. ~Betty Crocker’s Picture Cook Book 1950

After decades of hybridizing, string beans finally lost the fibrous strand that ran the length of each bean as announced by the authors of Betty Crocker’s Picture Cook Book 1950. With no strings attached, the beans eventually came to be known as green beans (however my grandmother called them string beans her whole life). The Modern Family Cook Book 1953 used modern terminology when naming its dish “Green” Bean Salad (recipe above). Celery and radishes were added for crunch, and mayonnaise is suggested as an option for dressing the salad.

3ebc5f7b6f8d91b1abcd5d8592002736At Long Last

Finally, in the early 1960s, a clever cook thought to add cooked dried beans to a marinated green bean salad —  and the rest, as they say, is history. In this charming 1964 women’s magazine ad for Kraft French (vinaigrette) Dressing, if we look closely enough, we can see a recipe for Three Bean Salad calling for 2 cups lima beans, 2 cups kidney beans, 2 cups cooked cut green beans, 1 cup chopped tomato, 1 cup sliced celery and half a cup of chopped sweet pickles, tossed with Kraft French (vinaigrette) Dressing.

 

Bean salads are always popular, especially for buffet serving. ~Ruth Ellen Church, Mary Meads Modern Homemaker Cookbook 1966

Ms. Church speaks authoritatively of the popularity of Bean Salads so we can assume that by 1966 the concept had been around for several years. Then, as with recipes now, cooks loved to personalize their dishes. The recipe in Mary Meads Modern Homemaker Cookbook 1966 is called Chinese Bean Salad (not surprising since Americans have had a fascination with “exotic” food post WWII). Ingredients include green beans, wax beans, (no dried beans however) water chestnuts and red onions tossed in a dressing of vinegar, sugar, salad oil, soy sauce and celery salt.

close up photo of raw green beans
Green Beans

Bean Salad Flattery

The Farm Journal’s Busy Woman’s Cookbook 1971 includes a recipe titled Overnight Bean Salad located in the “Make-Ahead Cooking” section promoting the convenience of Bean Salad. Interestingly, the recipe is exactly the same recipe as described above from The Good Housekeeping Cookbook 1963. Its said that imitation is the best form of flattery. I’d say its also a good indicator of a great recipe.

Below is my family’s recipe for Bean Salad. We call it Four Bean Salad. It could also be called Four Generation Bean Salad as it is the recipe my grandmother used, the one my mother and I use and the one my daughters now use. Anyone of us could say, “I’m going on a picnic and I’m going to bring a really good Bean Salad”. Enjoy!

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Four Bean Salad

  • Servings: 10
  • Difficulty: Easy
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Ingredients

  • 2 (14.5 oz) cans cut green beans
  • 1 (14.5 oz) can cut wax beans
  • 1 (15.5 oz) can kidney beans
  • 1 (15.5 oz) can garbanzo beans
  • 1 (4 oz) jar diced pimientos
  • 1 small sweet onion, thinly sliced
  • 1 green bell pepper

Dressing:

  • 2/3 cup cider vinegar
  • 1/3 cup salad oil
  • 3/4 cup granulated sugar
  • 1 tsp kosher salt
  • Ground black pepper to taste

Directions

  1. Rinse and drain garbanzo beans and kidney beans. Drain green beans and wax beans. Place in a large bowl and add pimientos, sliced sweet onion and bell pepper.
  2. In a small bowl, combine vinegar, salad oil, sugar, salt and pepper; whisk to combine. Drizzle over prepared beans and vegetables; toss to coat.
  3. Store in air-tight container in the refrigerator for six hours or overnight, stirring from time to time.

Recipe Compliments of cookbooklady.com

 

 

 

Creamed New Potatoes (and Peas)

Creamed New Potatoes (and Peas)

Every spring, when I was a kid, my mom would make Creamed New Potatoes and Peas. My siblings and I loved it. Recently, I started wondering about the history of this dish — did the world know about Creamed New Potatoes and Peas or was it just a regional dish developed here in potato-growing country. I delved into my twentieth-century cookbooks to see what I could find. Right away, I learned that Creamed Potatoes has been a “thing” for at least a century, but the peas? Not so much. I also learned, quite unexpectedly, about a “lost” recipe style.

What’s In a Recipe?

My mother cooked mostly without a recipe, but as modern home cooks, we have some expectations regarding the information to be included in a recipe — a list of ingredients, the amount needed, directions on assembly, cooking or baking instructions, even serving suggestions. Interestingly, a number of recipes in my older cookbooks are written instead in a short truncated style that doesn’t include a lot of detail, leaving a home cook to rely on her own instincts and kitchen experience.

Examples of recipes written in this brief style:

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Creamed New Potatoes 1966

There are no amounts given in the recipe above, nor does it tell the ratio of potatoes to white sauce.  Another brief recipe below, gives only three sentences of instruction. The third recipe again has no measurements. I’m lost!

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Creamed Potatoes 1939

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Creamed Potatoes 1950

No wonder my mother and grandmother didn’t cook with a recipe. They weren’t always that helpful. One cookbook from the 1930s had so many recipes written in this truncated format that the editors gave them a name — “recipe-ettes” (see below). I’m glad this style didn’t catch on. I prefer lots of detail in my recipes.

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“Recipe-ettes” 1939

A Creamy Foundation

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Standard Recipe for White Sauce 1966

While reading, I also looked into the history of white sauce (see recipe above). I learned that white sauce is simply the American version of a french sauce that has been around for hundreds of years called Bechamel (recipe below). Both sauces begin with a roux, which is a mixture of equal parts fat (usually butter) and flour that is cooked together for several minutes. For the American sauce, cold milk or cream is whisked into the hot roux, brought to a boil and simmered until the mixture is thickened. The French add broth to the roux, then finish the bechamel with cream. They also tend to cook their sauces much longer than Americans. I guess we are in a hurry.

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Bechamel Sauce 1913

Some Creamed New Potato recipes call for a super-simple sauce of heated cream seasoned with butter and salt and pepper to be poured over cooked potatoes (below). That’s for when we are really in a hurry.

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Company Creamed Potatoes 1959

Herbs and Seasonings

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New York Times Cook Book 1961

Adding herbs or spices to an ordinary dish is a great way to personalize a recipe and turn it into a signature dish. My old cookbooks offered some suggestions. The New York Times Cook Book 1961 featured a recipe for Herbed New Potatoes with Fresh Peas (finally someone added peas!). It calls for two pounds new potatoes, one pound fresh shelled green peas and a little light cream with dried basil for flavor and fresh parsley for garnish.  A Creamed Potatoes recipe found in Joy of Cooking 1985 calls for boiled new potatoes, white sauce and dill seed for flavor.  Betty Crocker’s Picture Cook Book 1950 calls for small new potatoes, white sauce and parsley or chives for garnish. Several other recipes call for a dusting of paprika to finish the dish.

IMG_5151In the late eighties, I watched a cooking show on PBS hosted by Marcia Adams, author of the award-winning cookbook Cooking from Quilt Country 1989 featuring regional (mid-west) home-style cooking. I enjoyed her program so much that I ordered the companion cookbook. I have loved it these past thirty years. The recipes are humble yet delicious, calling for ingredients readily available from farmer’s markets and grocery stores. It is from this book (and my mom’s “recipe”) that I based my recipe for Creamed New Potatoes and Peas (Yes! Adam’s recipe actually calls for peas). She uses two pounds small red potatoes and a cup and a half of green peas, fresh or frozen. The peas are added to the thin white sauce that has been seasoned with nutmeg (I have never included nutmeg), and is then poured over the boiled potatoes. She suggests a garnish of mint leaves or chives. The directions for the dish are four paragraphs long with plenty of detail. Awesome! With the addition of chopped onion, celery and a little garlic, the recipe has become my own. Enjoy!

Creamed Peas and Potatoes

  • Servings: 6-8
  • Difficulty: Intermediate
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Ingredients

  • 3 lbs red potatoes

  • 1/4 cup butter
  • 2 ribs celery, finely chopped
  • 1/2 sweet onion, finely diced
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1/4 cup all-purpose flour

  • 1 cup chicken broth
  • 1-1/2 cup half and half
  • 1/4 cup evaporated milk
  • 1 tsp seasoning salt

  • 6 oz frozen petite peas
  • 1 Tbsp fresh lemon juice
  • Salt and Pepper to taste
  • Sprinkling of smoked paprika or chopped chives for garnish

Directions

  1. Fill medium pot with 1-1/2 quarts water and a Tablespoon of kosher salt; set aside. Rinse potatoes and peel if desired, place into salted water to prevent browning.
  2. Over medium-high heat, bring potatoes to a boil. Reduce heat to medium and simmer for 5 — 6 minutes or until fork tender. Drain and set aside.
  3. Meanwhile, chop celery,  dice onion and mince garlic; set aside.
  4. In a Dutch-oven, melt butter over medium heat. Saute prepared vegetables in butter until limp. Stir in flour to create a roux. Cook and stir for two minutes.
  5. Whisk in chicken broth, half and half and evaporated milk all at once. Bring mixture to a boil, stirring frequently. Reduce heat and simmer 5 minutes or until sauce is thickened. Add seasoning salt.
  6. Turn heat to low and stir in cooked potatoes, frozen peas and lemon juice. Adjust seasonings, garnish and serve.

Recipe Compliments of cookbooklady.com