Cucumber Salad with Sour Cream Dressing

Cucumber Salad with Sour Cream Dressing

Heaven is a homegrown cucumber. ~Alys Fowler

Cucumbers taste like summertime. Simply sliced with a sprinkling of salt or added to a green salad they are a refreshing bite. We are all familiar with the classic Cucumber Salad made with  slices of fresh cucumber marinated in vinegar and salt and pepper. Its a recipe that has been around for generations. In this post, I’m sharing another favorite cucumber recipe — Cucumber Salad with Sour Cream Dressing. It is a combination of sliced cucumbers and leeks seasoned with fresh garlic and dill and marinated in a sour cream dressing. I have served this dish as a part of a catered salad bar and as a summer side-dish and it is a crowd pleaser. Enjoy!

Cucumber Salad with Sour Cream Dressing

  • Servings: 4
  • Difficulty: Easy
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Ingredients

1 large English cucumber, sliced

6 – 8 slices of leek, white part only

Dressing:

1/2 cup sour cream

2 tsp seasoned rice vinegar

1/2 tsp dried dill weed

1/4 tsp seasoning salt (my favorite)

1 small clove garlic, minced

Dash of kosher salt and cracked black pepper

Directions

Peel cucumber, if desired, and cut in 1/4″ slices. Thinly slice leeks and toss vegetables together in a bowl; set aside.

To prepare dressing, whisk together sour cream and seasoned rice vinegar in a small bowl. Stir in minced garlic, seasoning salt, dill weed, salt and pepper.

Toss cucumbers and leeks with prepared dressing. Refrigerate for two hours or more in an air-tight container to allow flavors to blend. Serve cold and garnish with additional dill weed.

Option: For a tasty and colorful addition, slice a fresh Roma tomato in 1/4″ slices and add to the dressed cucumbers and leeks.

Recipe compliments of Cookbooklady.com

Green Bean Salad — 1961

Green Bean Salad — 1961

In my quest to add interest to my catered salad bars, I took inspiration from a recipe for Green Bean Salad in The New York Times Cook Book 1961 (below). After tinkering with this recipe for several years, I came up with a dressing that is jazzy and delicious. This salad is served cold after marinating several hours or overnight, so it is a great summer salad and/or side-dish especially when serving Italian food. Enjoy!

green bean salad 001

Below is my interpretation of this “lost” recipe. I call it Marinated Green Bean Salad:

Marinated Green Bean Salad

Ingredients

  • 1 lb. young slender green beans
  • 1/2 tsp kosher salt

Dressing:

  • 2/3 cup Olive Garden Italian Dressing
  • 2 – 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • Dash cracked black pepper

Garnish:

  • 1 – 2 Tbsp grated Parmesan cheese for garnish

Directions

  1. Wash and drain green beans and snap off blossom ends (snap off tails if desired).
  2. Bring a quart of water and 1/2 tsp salt to a boil in a medium pot; add prepared green beans and cover.
  3. Once pot returns to a boil, set timer for four minutes (Cook time depends on size of green beans. If beans are a little thicker, add another minute to the  cook time).
  4. Immediately plunge cooked green beans into very cold water to cool. Drain and set aside.
  5. Combine dressing ingredients and set aside.
  6. Arrange green beans in an air-tight container, drizzle dressing over beans, cover and refrigerate for at least two hours. (Swirl the beans around in the container from time to time while marinating). 
  7. To serve, arrange green beans on a platter draining away most of the dressing. Garnish with Parmesan cheese.

Recipe Compliments of Cookbooklady.com

 

The Seventies Salad Bar

The Seventies Salad Bar
Salad can get a bad rap. People think of bland and watery iceberg lettuce, but in fact, salads are an art form, from the simplest rendition to a colorful kitchen-sink approach.~Marcus Samuelsson

One of the earliest and definitely the largest salad bars ever featured appeared regularly in an American food restaurant in Chicago called R J Grunts beginning in 1971. The restaurant boasted forty different ingredients in their salad bar at any one time. Inspired by the health food craze of the 1970s, it was a virtual self-serve farmer’s market on a plate with most ingredients presented in their rawest form. This restaurant sparked the salad bar trend that swept the nation. And oh how we Americans love a good salad bar, so much so,  that we have come to expect one in every restaurant and grocery store — the bigger the better; however, no one has done it as well as R J Grunts. Many small restaurants have tried to stay on trend by offering  run-of-the-mill iceberg lettuce, cherry tomatoes, sliced cucumbers, pickled beets, shredded carrots, boiled eggs, frozen peas, croutons and shredded cheese, but a great salad bar is what Americans have sought after for fifty years.  Sadly, covid19 has taken away the option of even eating out safely. One wonders if the American salad bar, as we have come to know it, will ever return.

Cookbook Lady’s Comments

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As a caterer, one of my underlying challenges was creating ways to jazz-up my salad bar offerings without breaking the bank or creating an overwhelming workload. I never came close to offering forty options, but I did come up with a variety of ways to add flavor and interest to a salad bar. Over the course of my next several posts, I will be sharing some of my most popular “salad bar” recipes that will also work well for jazzing-up family meals, so check back often. Enjoy!